IMG_2517 Rockers.jpgIMG_2500 Lovely china.jpgIMG_2535 Quilts.jpgIMG_2498 Dining Room.jpgIMG_2538 Fireplace Mantel.jpgIMG_2527 American Linen.jpgIMG_2511 Table lamp and glass.jpgIMG_2537 Stair bannister quilts.jpg

 

 

Federal Grove History

Since 1835, Federal Grove has had  a reputation for southern charm and hospitality when travelers from Louisville, Nashville and surrounding areas, would stop by for a short stay to be refreshed.

During 1785, General Jonathan Clark, the eldest brother of William Clark from the Lewis and Clark expedition team, had been awarded 10,000 acres of prime land for his service in the Revolutionary War.

This grant of land had to be taken west of the Green River in Kentucky. General Jonathan Clark made his first stop at Federal Grove to be with daughter, Eleanor and son-in-law Benjamin Temple. They would establish Federal Grove, a 1,700 acre plantation in 1805.

The farm would eventually grow to over 2,000 acres. They would have abundant crops of corn, wheat and a large livestock operation. There were 26 slaves on the plantation.

Eleanor would leave Federal Grove after the passing of her husband, Mr. Temple and later would sell the property to Captain Harrison Wood.

During his time there Captain Wood re-named the settlement to Woodville. There would be the creation of a general store, blacksmith shop and a small schoolhouse during the 1850’s.

It is told that during the Civil War, Captain Wood “high-tailed” it out to Texas in fear for his life.

No battles took place at Federal Grove but many Confederate and Union soldiers would travel through this place. They would take things they needed along the way.

A young gentleman farmer, named James Monroe Hall,  bought Federal Grove in 1871 and would stay in the Hall Family until 1991.

Terry and Wayne Blythe would purchase 13 acres and the home. In 1992 after being restored it was turned into a lovely, southern B&B with a restaurant.

Another fine point is that Federal Grove, by many accounts, are the southernmost maple syrup producers! During the winter month of January the sap begins to flow with periods of freezing and thawing all the way until early March. The sap collected is a tedious task of boiling the sugary sap until it turns into a lovely syrup. It is amazing that it takes 35-50 gallons of boiled sap to produce one gallon of syrup.

If you want a taste of the Kentucky South, come by Federal Grove to sample the many charms that await you!

The lovely owners were very gracious and let me visit for a spell and take some lovely photographs that display the charm and elegance of a Kentucky Bed and Breakfast at its finest!

Please follow me and stay tuned for more exciting historical journeys from the American Mid-west!

 

IMG_2521 Tommie at Federal Grove

Copyright Information-

All photographs found on this site are copyrighted to @TommieFlanneryBaskis, Duskflyer Vision Artwork- Unauthorized use and/or duplication of photographs without express and written permission are strictly prohibited!

 

 

 

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